The Singapore Flyer

A surefire way of getting the perfect panoramic view of the city skyline, the Singapore Flyer is an experience not to be missed. One of the world’s largest observation wheels that takes you 165 metres high into the sky, this icon landmark was designed by world-renowned architect Dr. Kisho Kurokawa from Japan and Singaporean architectural firm DP Architects. Each rotation takes around 30 minutes, and on a clear day you’ll get to see as far as Malaysia and Indonesia.

Following Feng-Shui

While the theme is very much avant-garde, the concept of the Flyer has been designed around Feng-Shui. Feng translates to ‘wind’ and shui means ‘water. In the Chinese culture, wind and water are associated with good health, which leads to good fortune. So to ensure the success of the Singapore Flyer, decisions made were based around Feng-Shui. Here are just some examples:

  • The Singapore Flyer has a total of 28 capsules each fitting 28 people (the digits 2 and 8 are considered to be prosperous in Chinese culture)
  • The grand opening of the wheel was held from the 11th to the 13th February (in time for Chinese New Year symbolising new beginnings)
  • Total ticket sales were capped at $8,888 (a number believed to bring wealth and prosperity in the Chinese culture)
  • The wheel initially rotated in a counter clockwise direction, but was soon reversed on advice from a Feng-Shui expert (counter clockwise is considered the draining direction)

It is hoped that the above decisions will lead to a prosperous time for the Singapore Flyer.


Other interesting facts about the Singapore Flyer

  • The diameter of the Singapore Flyer is the length of 87 average height Singaporean men lying down head to toe
  • The Singapore Flyer is around the height of an average 42 storey building
  • On graduation day, a celebratory walk under the bell tower is a rite of passage for students
  • Even though you climb closer to the sun, the Singapore Flyer has been designed to protect you against higher levels of UV sunrays